Tag Archives: endorsements

Wisconsin State Journal Endorses Romney (Endorsed Obama in 2008)

Our pick: Mitt Romney

Not enough hope and too little change.

That is President Barack Obama’s record on the economy, debt and Washington gridlock after four years in the White House.

The State Journal editorial board endorses Mitt Romney in Tuesday’s presidential election.

Romney showed as the Republican governor of Democratic-leaning Massachusetts that he can find agreement across the partisan divide. And his vice presidential pick — Wisconsin’s U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Janesville — suggests Romney is serious about tackling America’s fiscal mess.

Romney has an impressive record of success in the private and public sectors. He’s a numbers guy who focuses more on results than ideology. That’s why so many of his fellow Republicans during the GOP primary criticized him for not being conservative enough.

Romney has been a strong leader in business and civic life. This includes turning around many troubled companies and the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Romney better understands how and why entrepreneurs and employers decide to expand and add jobs. He’s more likely to get the private-sector going strong again.

Romney displayed reasonableness and smarts during the debates. And his view on the most pressing foreign policy question — Iran — is similar to his opponent’s.

Yes, Romney did his share of flip-flopping and pandering during the GOP primary to get past stubborn party stalwarts. Yes, Romney’s talk of repealing the Affordable Care Act and boosting military spending are unrealistic. We disagree with Romney on a host of social issues, from marriage equality to abortion rights.

This is not an easy endorsement to make.

Obama is the more likeable candidate and inspiring speaker. Obama inherited a mess from his predecessor, Republican President George W. Bush, who was even more disappointing than Obama has been.

Obama got us out of Iraq. He pressured public schools to reform. He gave the final order that got Osama bin Laden.

But this election is about jobs, the slow economy and Washington’s dysfunction. Our leaders can’t even pass a budget, much less stabilize soaring debt that’s burdening our children and grandchildren.

Obama failed to embrace his own commission’s bipartisan debt deal. Ryan, serving on the commission, similarly balked at the solid and comprehensive agreement.

But Obama is the president. The buck stops with him. This is now Obama’s economy, even though the GOP shares in the blame for partisan games.

It was Obama and his fellow Democrats who went it alone on health care, making subsequent deals even harder to find. It was Obama who too often let Congress steer the ship in circles. It still is Obama who hasn’t laid out a clear vision for the next four years.

We endorsed Obama for change last time around. Now we’re endorsing change again: Mitt Romney.

Nashua Telegraph (New Hampshire) Endorses Romney (Endorsed Obama in 2008)

Another Battleground State makes the switch:

Mitt Romney for president

Four years ago, with little hesitation, we endorsed then-Sen. Barack Obama to become the 44th president of the United States, saying it was a time for “new leadership, a new approach to governing, a new way of conducting the people’s business.”

So the basic question facing The Telegraph editorial board when it met last week came down to this: Did the former Illinois senator do enough to live up to those admittedly high expectations to warrant a second term?

After several hours of spirited debate, not unlike conversations taking place in kitchens and living rooms across America, we reached a consensus that he had not. Perhaps more importantly, when we identified the key challenges facing the nation – jobs, the economy and the national debt – we concluded he was not the best candidate to meet them.

That person is former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, and we hereby endorse him to become the 45th president of the United States.

During his many years in the private and public sectors, Romney has demonstrated the critical leadership skills necessary to bring people together toward a common goal.

He did it when he founded a successful investment firm at age 37. He did it when he helped rescue a scandal-plagued Salt Lake City Winter Olympics in 2002. And he did it when he worked with an overwhelmingly Democratic Legislature after being elected governor of Massachusetts that same year.

As we noted when we endorsed Romney for the GOP nomination prior to the New Hampshire primary in January, Washington is broken. In order to fix it, it will take a strong leader willing to roll up his sleeves and work directly with the heads of both parties to carve out the best possible solutions.

We believe Romney has demonstrated that he can do that; the president has had four years to demonstrate that he can’t.

Continue reading

Newspapers Endorsing Romney After Endorsing Obama in 2008

When I see  a major Battleground State paper changing their endorsement I have posted them on this blog. But plenty of papers beyond the Battlegrounds are also voting for change this election.  Here is a collection of all papers who have switched their support:

  1. Des Moines Register: “Mitt Romney Offers A Fresh Economic Vision” “Voters should give Mitt Romney a chance to correct the nation’s fiscal course and to implode the partisan gridlock that has shackled Washington and the rest of America — with the understanding that he would face the same assessment in four years if he does not succeed.” (Editorial, “Mitt Romney Offers A Fresh Economic Vision,” Des Moines Register, 10/27/12)
  2. The Daily Herald (Illinois): “[W]e Endorse Romney Because He, Unlike Obama, Understands That Jobs Are A Creation Of Business, Not Of Government.” “But ultimately, we endorse Romney because he, unlike Obama, understands that jobs are a creation of business, not of government. And that to encourage job growth, we need policies that incent business to grow and provide it with a stable environment for that growth.” (Editorial, “Endorsement: The Case For Mitt Romney For President,” The Daily Herald, 10/28/12)
  3. Florida Today: “Romney Has A Clearer Vision For A Modern Economy…” “Over the next four years, Washington must foster a more competitive economy and balance federal budgets. Florida voters rate jobs and business growth as their No. 1 concern by far. For those reasons, we endorse former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney for president. Romney has a clearer vision for a modern economy. He has a better understanding than President Barack Obama of what could help manufacturers and service companies grow and hire. And he has executive experience and a record of problem solving that Obama did not have before taking office.” (Editorial, “We Recommend Mitt Romney For President,” Florida Today, 10/28/12)
  4. Pensacola News Journal: “We Believe [Mitt Romney] Has The Experience And Temperament To Start The Repairs.” “As he did in 2008, Mitt Romney is campaigning that ‘Washington is broken’: that Congress and the president can neither legislate nor lead effectively. We believe he has the experience and temperament to start the repairs. If elected, we urge him to gather key Democrats on Nov. 7 and start to find solutions to our problems.” (Editorial, “We Recommend: Mitt Romney For President,” Pensacola News Journal, 10/28/12)
  5. Naples Daily News: “[W]e Believe It Will Take Another Administration Change, To Romney, To Bring The Leadership That Will Make That Recovery Timely, Robust And Sustainable.” “This time four years ago, this newspaper’s editorial board sized up the state of the economy and other issues and concluded the country needed a change, to Obama. While we believe the national economy is on the way back, we believe it will take another administration change, to Romney, to bring the leadership that will make that recovery timely, robust and sustainable.” (Editorial, “President Of The United States,” Naples Daily News, 10/28/12)
  6.  Quad City Times: “[W]e Endorse A Successful Leader Focused On Economic Recovery And Growth And Deficit Reduction.” “Today, we endorse a successful leader focused on economic recovery and growth and deficit reduction. We endorse a proven manager who won’t need on-the-job training. We endorse a compromiser who offers the best hope of breaking congressional gridlock. Most of all, we endorse change. We endorse Mitt Romney for president.” (Editorial, “Ready For Change,” Quad City Times, 10/28/12)
  7.  Los Angeles Daily News: “Romney Has Proven His Leadership Qualities…” “Four years ago, as America faced serious trouble at home and abroad, this news organization embraced the need for bold change to a different brand of leadership and endorsed Barack Obama for president. … Romney has proven his leadership qualities as a business success, as the trouble-shooting head of the Salt Lake City Olympics, and as the governor of Democratic Party-dominated Massachusetts.” (Editorial, “Elect Mitt Romney President,” Los Angeles Daily News, 10/28/12)
  8.  Fort Worth Star-Telegram: “Romney Has Laid Out A Consistent Theme … That Theme Is A Winner.” “Romney has laid out a consistent theme focused on encouraging business innovation and growth, reducing government spending and its economic footprint and educating and retraining people to take new jobs. That theme is a winner, and Congress will be receptive when Romney brings it.”(Editorial, “Mitt Romney: New Leadership For More Economic Growth,” Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 10/21/12)
  9. Reno Gazette-Journal: “We Find Ourselves In Need Of Change Yet Again. Romney Must Be The Leader To Get Things Moving.” “Based on our current fiscal condition, a still-weak economy and a Congress deeply divided along party lines, our next president will continue to face a daunting challenge, one that must be met for the good of the country. Four years later, we find ourselves in need of change yet again. Romney must be the leader to get things moving.” (Editorial, “Nevada Needs A Change Now; Elect Mitt Romney President,”Reno Gazette-Journal, 10/20/12)
  10. Orlando Sentinel: “He Understands That Reviving The Economy And Repairing The Government’s Balance Sheet Are Imperative.” “[T]he core of Romney’s campaign platform, his five-point plan, at least shows he understands that reviving the economy and repairing the government’s balance sheet are imperative — now, not four years in the future. … We endorse Mitt Romney for president. (Editorial, “Our Pick For President: Romney,” Orlando Sentinel, 10/19/12)
  11.    New York Observer: “A Strong Leader … [He] Promises To Bring A New And Refreshing Attitude To Washington.” “Mitt Romney stands out because—unlike so many candidates in the past—he understands how to build businesses, create efficiencies, make tough deals and carefully consider divergent viewpoints. America needs a strong leader, a practical leader. … [He] promises to bring a new and refreshing attitude to Washington, one that speaks to his experience as both a successful business leader and the governor of a state not known for its affection for Republicans.” (Editorial, “Romney For President,” New York Observer, 10/16/12)
  12.  South Florida Sun-Sentinel: “We Need A Leader Who Will Chart A Clear Course, Sweat The Details And Get The Job Done Right.” “In these uncertain times, we need a leader who will chart a clear course, sweat the details and get the job done right. We believe Romney’s past performance is a predictor of his future behavior. He’s proven himself to be a successful businessman. He rescued the 2002 Winter Olympics from scandal and mismanagement. He worked with a Democrat-dominated legislature as governor of Massachusetts to close a $3 billion budget deficit — without borrowing and raising taxes.” (Editorial, “Sun Sentinel Endorses Mitt Romney For President,” Sun Sentinel, 10/26/12)

Naples Daily News, Florida Endorses Romney (Endorsed Obama in 2008)

Another flip in editorial endorsements:

Editorial: President of the United States

After two years of speeches, forums, debates, press releases, testimonials and attack ads, the presidential election yields something clear and concise.

This really is all about the economy.

Given Democratic President Barack Obama’s attempts over the past four years to improve it, and Republican nominee Mitt Romney’s credentials as an astute businessman who understands how money works, our endorsement goes to Romney.

This time four years ago, this newspaper’s editorial board sized up the state of the economy and other issues and concluded the country needed a change, to Obama.

While we believe the national economy is on the way back, we believe it will take another administration change, to Romney, to bring the leadership that will make that recovery timely, robust and sustainable.

Our own community has a clear-cut stake in all of this. New home construction and sales — the bedrock of the economy in our region as well as Florida as a whole — was one of the first industries to go into the abyss. We believe Southwest Florida and the rest of the state can lead the way out of this recession, especially with Romney and new economic advisers who are battle-tested in business at the helm.

We believe Romney knows what it means for government to make it easier for business to do business, and that is where the comeback ought to start.

We believe a Romney administration will move instinctively toward spending and taxation policies that will free up money for investment and economic diversification — and jobs.

A Romney administration would be well advised to avoid the distractions and divisiveness that often come with social issues. Those can wait.

At the same time, we call on Romney, moving forward, to make sure health care coverage remains accessible to all, as he did as governor of Massachusetts; that energy independence and diversity means more than drill, baby, drill; and Everglades restoration remains on track.

President Obama did as well as he could against tall odds, with some Republican leaders and media voices vowing from his inauguration to make sure he does not have another swearing-in ceremony. Still, despite those strident messages — which at times subjected him to more and wilder conspiracy theories than any public figure in history — a better leader could have made more progress on reducing the deficit and a health-care plan that enjoyed bipartisan buy-in.

President Bill Clinton did it in 1994 after a convincing Republican “Contract with America” sweep. Obama failed to attempt the same reality-driven statesmanship following the midterm 2010 GOP sweep.

The Obama presidency can claim its share of positives, including the killing of Osama bin Laden and the passage of the economic stimulus, without which our economy would have totally cratered. Yet, that stimulus, and two wars, did not come cheaply. We have more confidence in Romney to lead us out of the hole and avoid the fiscal cliff that awaits us.

So do investors, boards of directors and CEOs, which brings us back to the economy.Do you wonder or do you know something different will happen in the next four years? With enough votes, we know something different will happen in the next four years with a Romney administration.

Some of the warnings about Obama’s lack of legislative and leadership skills have come true over the past four years. It is not worth risking the state of our economy for the next four years to see whether his learning curve really is behind him.

We have more confidence in Romney being able to build upon the economy as far as the Obama administration has been able to resuscitate it.

Despite all the conflicting messages about the candidates being weak on terrorism or uncaring toward Americans, ambassadors or allies in need — none of which we believe to be true — this campaign comes to a finale on getting the private sector back to what it does best.

  • Progress.
  • Moving forward.
  • Making money.
  • Reinventing science and medicine.
  • Working.
  • Building.
  • Our community can be out front of all of that.
  • Our state can be out front of all of that.

We believe Mitt Romney is the candidate for president of the United States to do what we have to do.

Quad City Times (Iowa) Endorses Romney (Endorsed Obama in 2008)

Another flip in endorsements for this paper that straddles Iowa and Illinois:

Our presidential endorsement: Ready for change

We invested heavily in hope back in 2008.

Our 2012 endorsement of Mitt Romney comes with an imperative for change.

The change that we’d hoped would elevate our economy wound up woefully short. The presidential gambit to place health-care reform ahead of economic recovery jeopardized both. President Barack Obama expended all of the presidential leadership on muscling through health care reform, leaving little for implementation and none for significant economic recovery.

We support many aspects of the president’s health care reform. But so much is left undone because of the president’s inability to win popular support for the reforms. For example, the health care exchanges so critical to implementation are stuck at square one. Nov. 16 is the federal government deadline for establishing exchanges, yet 35 states have balked. Even the president’s home state has ignored the directive.

That’s just one example of flagging leadership on an issue that defines the Obama presidency.

Sadly, others exist.

The president’s green energy initiatives were intended to launch a U.S. alternative energy boom. Earlier this month, A123 Systems joined the succession of green energy firms that failed after being selected by the Obama administration for preferential grants. Beacon Power. Abound Solar. EnerDel. Solyndra. All stumbled despite receiving hundreds of millions of dollars in taxpayer-funded grants.

The president laments congressional gridlock that fomented under the inflammatory leadership of Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Harry Reid. The president’s deference to their reckless rhetoric further deepened congressional divide. Obama doesn’t deserve all of the blame. But he merits little credit for any meaningful attempt to bridge the gap.

That gap pushed the U.S. to a series of precipitous deadlines, including the sequestration ledge where Congress currently is perched. Lots of blame to go around and some of it lands squarely on a president who chose a marginal health care victory over a badly needed growth agenda.

Our hopeful 2008 endorsement went to a promising up ’n comer over a lackluster challenger who botched his first big presidential decision by picking an unqualified running mate. Sen. John McCain’s choice of Sarah Palin struck us, and apparently millions of undecided voters, as a calculated political ploy, not a credible presidential successor.

This year, the Republican ticket is led by a candidate with a proven record of moderate governance, legislative leadership and compromise. Mitt Romney arrives at the presidency with global leadership experience and a track record of turnarounds.

No need to rely on hope. His record includes evidence of change. He changed the trajectory of a failing U.S. Winter Olympics. He changed the path of Massachusetts with a health care plan we admire, even if Romney is now less than enthused.

He picked a running mate who has specific deficit reduction plans, not just hopeful intentions. Ryan’s plan cuts too deeply in some areas and needs significant compromise, particularly on the future of Medicare, but these plans are in the hands of a presidential team experienced in compromise.

Our interest in Romney jelled into support through the debates, where we saw his leadership and pragmatic managerial experience shine through. He didn’t just say what ardent Republicans wanted to hear. In fact, he stated his unequivocal support for women’s contraception rights, knowing it would incense a huge number of Christian and Catholic voters.

Romney described himself in alignment with most of the president’s foreign policy directives.

What differs for us is his lifelong leadership success. We don’t begrudge his Bain Capital decisions, all legal and lucrative on behalf of his employers and investors. He made different decisions when he worked for the people of Massachusetts as governor.

We’re confident he’ll be as responsive to all Americans if elected president.

We heard the eavesdrop audio of Romney’s glib reference to a small group of acquaintances about the 47 percent. We also heard Obama’s comments to Russian President Vladimir Putin. For this endorsement, we take our queues not from excerpts of overheard remarks or lip-slips. We rely on leadership experience, detailed public statements and our personal meetings with the candidates during this and the 2007 caucus campaigns.

Today, we endorse a successful leader focused on economic recovery and growth and deficit reduction. We endorse a proven manager who won’t need on-the-job training. We endorse a compromiser who offers the best hope of breaking congressional gridlock.

Most of all, we endorse change.

We endorse Mitt Romney for president.

South Florida Sun Sentinel Endorses Romney (Endorsed Obama in 2008)

Sun Sentinel endorses Mitt Romney for president

Sun Sentinel Editorial Board

Brush away all the rhetoric, all the vitriol, all the divisiveness from the presidential campaign. To most Americans, only one thing matters — the economy.

Four years into Barack Obama’s presidency, economic growth is sputtering. Family incomes are down. Poverty is up. Business owners are reluctant to assume risk in the face of unending uncertainty. Many are holding on by their fingernails, desperate for signs of an economic recovery that will help them provide for themselves, their employees, their customers and their communities.

When President Obama came into office in 2009, the economy was in freefall and though untested, he inspired us with his promise of hope and change. Now, four years later, we have little reason to believe he can turn things around.

So while we endorsed Obama in 2008, we recommend voters choose Republican Mitt Romney on Nov. 6.

Continue reading

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Declines to Endorse Obama (Endorsed Him in 2008)

Although this is a complete Journalistic cop-out, this is a win for Romney because it is a change away from Obama and the paper is in liberal central Milwaukee. It is only further evidence of the shifting tide away from hopey-changey:. This lack of endorsement is the phase of the Romney campaign where they said: “It’s OK, you tried, he tried, but it’s time to let him go …”

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel decides not to endorse in presidential and Senate races

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel — Wisconsin’s largest and most influential news organization — won’t be endorsing in the very tight presidential and races this year. (Oct. 17 headline: “Marquette Law School Poll finds presidential and Senate races tied in Wisconsin.”)

I asked editorial page editor David Haynes about this and he replied in an email: “I’m writing a column on our decision for the Sunday paper. We may post that early (Friday). As a point of history: The JS did not endorse in the 2000 presidential election, and I remember [editor] Marty Kaiser writing at the time that it was not the first time that a newspaper in Milwaukee had not endorsed. It wasn’t common, but it had happened before.”

Will the paper be making any endorsements? “Sorry, going to have to put you off until we tell our readers,” Haynes replied.

I’m told that both U.S. Senate candidates Tammy Baldwin and Tommy Thompson were furious when they heard the no-endorsement news; I’ve requested comment from both campaigns.

Inside the paper, I’m told, there’s the feeling that “we have two tough picks to make and we’re taking a pass,” and the paper is less relevant because of it.

Five years ago, a Journal Sentinel staffer told Milwaukee Magazine that “we should endorse for president or get out of the editorial business.” In the same media column, the head of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee journalism department said: “If you’re not going to editorialize on the most important topic of the day, and if you’re not going to take a stand in the most important presidential election of our lives, what’s the point?”

The Reno Gazette-Journal Endorse Romney (endorsed Obama four years ago)

The Reno Gazette-Journal endorsed John Kerry in 2004 and Barack Obama in 2008:

Nevada needs a change now; elect Mitt Romney president

RECOMMENDATION: Republican Mitt Romney
OUR VIEW: Nevada, the state hit hardest by the Great Recession, cannot afford four more years of the same, and President Obama hasn’t offered any tangible proposals to change course.

The Gazette-Journal recommends a vote for former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney for president of the United States.

It wasn’t an easy decision. A recommendation against an incumbent can’t be taken lightly.

President Barack Obama inherited a ghastly mess when he took office in January 2009. He demonstrated a clear understanding in his inaugural address, when he stated, “That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened …”

Nevada was the state hit hardest by the great recession, and four years later, the state continues to lag well behind the others as the U.S. economy shows signs of slow improvement. Its unemployment rate remains worst in the nation; the foreclosure rate, while no longer No. 1, is still among the worst; and the tourism industry continues to struggle. And because of that, public services have been decimated and our schools, in particular, are failing to meet the needs of a state determined to diversify its economy.

However, while he had to contend with a Republican Party that was determined to deny him a second term at any cost, Obama cannot avoid the consequences of poor decisions and misplaced priorities.

Foremost among them was his early focus on an overreaching health-care reform plan that wasted 12 very valuable months of his and Congress’ time and cost him precious political capital. The manner in which the legislation was drafted violated Obama’s pledge to govern openly, and its passage — leveraged through a supermajority — served to further galvanize the partisan divide in Congress. Fear of the impact of that reform and the costs associated with it continue to play a major role in preventing businesses from hiring new employees at a time when nearly everyone agrees that jobs must be the president’s foremost goal.

A vote to re-elect Obama promises four more years of the same. In the two debates between the two candidates so far (a third, on foreign affairs, is scheduled for Monday), the president has shown little understanding of how his failures are affecting the nation, and he hasn’t offered any tangible proposals to change course.

That said, Romney is not without failings. The Republican candidate has shown a troubling willingness to shift his position on key issues, and the Romney who sat down with the Gazette-Journal’s Editorial Board in January did not appear to be the same one seen on the primary campaign trail, and that Romney seemed to be different than the one we saw at the two presidential debates held thus far.

But the United States, and Nevada, cannot afford four more years of the same. The change Obama promised four years ago is needed right now.

As president, Romney’s most important task will be to convince a recalcitrant Congress — including unhappy Democrats who will want to emulate the Republican blockade of the past few years — that there are good reasons to work with him. We’re hopeful that his willingness to shift positions is the hallmark of a consensus builder who can work across party lines to govern the country effectively and not political expedience.

In 2008, the RGJ warned that a vote for the little-known Obama was a gamble, albeit one that Americans should embrace. The country was in need of a course correction.

Based on our current fiscal condition, a still-weak economy and a Congress deeply divided along party lines, our next president will continue to face a daunting challenge, one that must be met for the good of the country. Four years later, we find ourselves in need of change yet again.

Romney must be the leader to get things moving.

Orlando Sentinel Endorses Romney (Endorsed Obama in 2008)

The Orlando Sentinel, who endorsed Barack Obama in 2008 (I promise), today endorsed Mitt Romney for President (h/t perdogg):

Our pick for president: Romney

Two days after his lackluster first debate performance, President Barack Obama’s re-election hopes got a timely boost. The government’s monthly jobless report for September showed the nation’s unemployment rate fell below 8 percent for the first time since he took office.

If that were the only metric that mattered, the president might credibly argue that the U.S. economy was finally on the right track. Unfortunately for him, and for the American people, he can’t.

Economic growth, three years into the recovery, is anemic. Family incomes are down, poverty is up. Obama’s Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, highlighted these and other hard truths in this week’s second debate.

Even the September jobless numbers deserve an asterisk, because more than 4 million Americans have given up looking for work since January 2009.

And while the nation’s economy is still sputtering nearly four years after Obama took office, the federal government is more than $5 trillion deeper in debt. It just racked up its fourth straight 13-figure shortfall.

We have little confidence that Obama would be more successful managing the economy and the budget in the next four years. For that reason, though we endorsed him in 2008, we are recommending Romney in this race.

Continue reading

“Clear Eyes. Full Hearts. Can’t Lose”

One of the truly great sports book ever written was Buzz Bissinger’s “Friday Night Lights”. The story was so compelling it was popular in every version — best-selling book, 2 movies (Varsity Blues and Friday Night Lights) and the hit TV show as well as dozens of different spin-offs. The mantra of the embattled coach in the story: “Clear eyes. Full heart. Can’t lose.”  That phrase was posted in the doorway at the debate in Denver when Romney stakes his claim to the Presidency.  Ever since that night, the phrase has been laced throughout every Romney campaign stop including his heart wrenching story of helping a 14-year-old boy write his own will. West Texas football isn’t an obvious fit for Mormon Mitt Romney doing missionary work in France who can speak multiple languages. But the passion, sincerity and silent struggle of that story fits Mitt more than you’d think and the mantra from the book has become a rallying cry in his speeches. The author of Friday Night Lights penned a column why he’s supporting Mitt Romney:

After the president’s debate performance in Denver, this lifelong Democrat has made a difficult decision: he’s given up on Barack Obama. Even if his own wife doesn’t approve.

This is not a frivolous decision, nor is it an easy one. I grew up on the Upper West Side of New York, arguably the country’s nexus of liberalogy, where it wouldn’t have surprised me in the least as a child to discover that my parents, along with all the other attendees in some basement garret reminiscent of the French Resistance, had thrown eggs at Abbie Hoffman at a political get-together because he wasn’t liberal enough.

Mitt reveals himself

Romney finally did what he should have done all along instead of his balky cha cha with the old white men of the conservative Republican wing: he acted as the moderate he is, for the first time running as himself, not against himself, embracing his record as governor of Massachusetts.

Obama the divider

I admit that as I get older, on the cusp of 58, I am moving more to the center or even tweaking right, or at least not tied to any ideology. Those making more than $250,000 should pay more taxes, and that does include me. But I also am tired of Obama’s constant demonization, of those he spits out as “millionaires and billionaires,” as pariahs. Romney’s comments at a fundraiser were stupid, but 47 percent of Americans do not pay federal income taxes. Yes, a majority are poor and seniors. But millions do not pay such taxes with incomes of more than $50,000, and whether it’s as little as $10, every American should contribute both as a patriotic obligation and skin in the game. This is our country, not our country club.

Liberal intolerance

The tipping point toward a candidate is perhaps the greatest act of individuality in our unique democracy, although in this day and age of unprecedented political divide, telling somebody who you are voting for has no upside: There is no respect for your right as a citizen, but outright hatred from those who do not agree with you. I fear that I will lose friends, some of whom I hold inside my heart. Of course, I will also lose friends I really don’t like anyway.

Romney makes the sale

At the debate, Romney did not simply act like he wanted to be president. He wants to be president. He showed vigor, and enthusiasm, and excitement, a man who wants to lead. It may all be ephemeral, because most of politics is ephemeral, a cynical means to the end of getting elected. But he also revealed compassion that, during the entirety of this absurdly long march, had never been in evidence before. He recognized the needs of the poor. He recognized the need for regulation.

Foreign policy failure

But I don’t see Obama spending much time running the country, unless you count his recent appearance on The View, where he was far more animated and charming than during the debate. He has said nary a word about the debacle in Benghazi in Libya where ambassador Chris Stevens was killed amidst all sort of questions over adequate security. While getting a tongue bath from Whoopi, he rejected meeting with Middle East leaders during the UN General Assembly, so essential in dealing with a region where personal relationships make a profound difference. As Syria burns more fiercely than ever, now enveloping Turkey with its own use of military force, he purposely stays as far away from it as he can, presumably until after the election if at all.

Obama not up to the job

[I]n the debate, more than 70 million were watching. It was a time for Obama to shine, not to mail in the same message, smooth and eloquent as always, but no longer connecting with an electorate that has been there done that (even the liberals will admit it behind the locked door of the bathroom after searching for bugs). I am not sure Obama really wants to be president in any practical way. He hates the rolling up of sleeves and schmoozing that is politics. He is no longer the chosen one. He is just too cool for school in a country desperate for the infectiousness of rejuvenation. Romney has it.Our president no longer does.

Las Vegas Review-Journal Endorses Romney

The largest newspaper in by far the largest city in Nevada, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, announced this morning its endorsement for Mitt Romney. The paper has backed both parties in the recent elections so this is a great pick-up for Romney.  In 2008 the Las Vegas Review-Journal endorsed candidate Obama John McCain and in 2004 the paper endorsed George Bush. [Note: I originally thought the paper backed Obama in 2008.  But they only endorsed him in the Democrat primaries.  In the general election they endorsed McCain. To all readers, especially Instapundit’s, my sincerest apologies]

No state had a bigger stake in Wednesday’s presidential debate than Nevada. No other state has suffered more economic hardship over the past five years. No state has a greater need for jobs than Nevada, which leads the nation with a real unemployment rate of at least 22 percent. No state will benefit more from a real economic recovery. Nevada is one of a handful of swing states that will decide which man wins the White House one month from now.

On Wednesday night, Nevadans watched Mr. Romney trounce the president. The evidence Mr. Romney systematically laid out exposed how the president’s top-down interventions have virtually paralyzed our economy – and he presented a solution. Nevadans need a president with a vision and political philosophy capable of restoring ingenuity, competition and excellence to our education and health care systems, of paring back the budget deficit and the explosive growth of our debt, of keeping energy affordable, of bringing back jobs and prosperity not just here, but in every American city with residents who want enough economic security to be able to take a Las Vegas vacation.

The answer is pro-growth tax and regulatory reform. The answer is tax and regulatory certainty for businesses. The answer is growing our way out of the budget deficit with a broader, simpler tax base and reduced rates and deductions for all – especially the risk-taker, the job creator and the entrepreneur. More jobs equals more taxpayers.

Mr. Romney is a Republican who was elected governor of heavily Democratic Massachusetts. He had to work with Democrats to get things done. His leadership and ability to bring people together saved the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. As a businessman, his management skills turned failing companies into profitable ones. Mr. Romney vows to do that, again, in Washington. If we are to avoid a lost decade and a future calamity created by inaction on entitlements and government growth, this nation needs a team of turnaround experts.

Mr. Romney is a fine family man who donates millions of dollars to his church and charity every year. There is not a whiff of scandal about him. This is why his opponents have tried to turn his very successes against him. It’s all they have. Early voting in Nevada begins Oct. 20. Election Day is Nov. 6. Over the last few weeks of this campaign, Nevadans must ask themselves which candidate will embrace policies that will put the people of this state back to work, creating the jobs that lift our incomes, our home values and our hope. The choice is clear. Only Mitt Romney has the principles and experience needed to put America back on the road to prosperity. The Review-Journal endorses Mitt Romney for president of the United States.